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Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13070 Views: 43k
Sukkot
Photographer: © Roman Dembitsky Date: 26.05.2010 Photo number: 15807 Views: 13k
Sukkot
Photographer: © Roman Dembitsky Date: 26.05.2010 Photo number: 15806 Views: 13k
Sukkot
Photographer: © Roman Dembitsky Date: 26.05.2010 Photo number: 15805 Views: 20k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13067 Views: 25k
Sukkot
Photographer: © Roman Dembitsky Date: 26.05.2010 Photo number: 15804 Views: 15k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13066 Views: 22k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13065 Views: 23k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13063 Views: 22k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13068 Views: 21k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13064 Views: 19k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13062 Views: 20k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13061 Views: 19k
Synagogues & Yeshivas \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13060 Views: 21k
Sukkoth
Photographer: © pmos_nmos Date: 27.10.2007 Photo number: 7585 Views: 27k
Jerusalem. Center City.
Sukkot...
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 04.10.2005 Photo number: 2531 Views: 18k