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Historical sites \ David´s Tomb
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.05.2005 Photo number: 1389 Views: 49k
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Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1396 Views: 26k
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Historical sites \ The Western (Wailing) Wall
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.02.2005 Photo number: 859 Views: 137k
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Historical sites \ Model of the Second Temple at the Israel Museum
This is in the model of Jerusalem at the time of the Second Temple. It was moved from the Holyland Hotel to the Israel Museum in late 2005.
Photographer: © Al Teich Date: 01.09.2007 Photo number: 7323 Views: 124k
Historical sites \ Jerusalem in the Time of the Second Temple
In the model of Jerusalem which recently moved from the Holyland Hotel to the Israel Museum.
Photographer: © Al Teich Date: 27.07.2006 Photo number: 5676 Views: 48k
Historical sites \ Jerusalem. Old City.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 09.05.2006 Photo number: 5001 Views: 38k
Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © Peter Rogov Date: 09.07.2009 Photo number: 9872 Views: 47k
Historical sites \ City Center
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 30.09.2007 Photo number: 7394 Views: 32k
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Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13496 Views: 57k
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Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13497 Views: 60k
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Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13498 Views: 52k
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Historical sites \ Jerusalem. Center City.
Pools of king Salomon.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 26.02.2006 Photo number: 4063 Views: 24k
Historical sites \ Reflection
Elad Sherman
www.eladsherman.co.uk
Photographer: © Elad Sherman Date: 02.06.2007 Photo number: 7053 Views: 38k
Historical sites \ The Tower of David
Photographer: © רפאל Date: 31.01.2010 Photo number: 13811 Views: 18k
Historical sites \ Old City, Mount Zion
Photographer: © pmos_nmos Date: 27.10.2007 Photo number: 7578 Views: 37k
Historical sites \ The Church of All Nations
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.06.2005 Photo number: 1816 Views: 77k
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Historical sites \ Elias Monastery in Jerusalem
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 20.07.2005 Photo number: 2232 Views: 68k
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Historical sites \ Dome of the Rock
Photographer: © ynissim Date: 08.07.2005 Photo number: 2113 Views: 182k
Historical sites \ Jerusalem. Old City.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 09.05.2006 Photo number: 5004 Views: 28k
Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1395 Views: 51k
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Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1401 Views: 48k
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Historical sites \ One night of a concert hall of the Scottish hospeace in Jerusalem
Photographer: © Ruslan Israel Spivak (SANCK) Date: 05.07.2005 Photo number: 2070 Views: 44k
Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
cript
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1412 Views: 49k
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Historical sites \ Elias Monastery in Jerusalem
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 20.07.2005 Photo number: 2229 Views: 54k
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Historical sites \ Jerusalem Bastion
Photographer: © Carmel Garcia from Malta Date: 22.03.2011 Photo number: 17007 Views: 23k
Historical sites \ Historical sites, Tombstones
Photographer: © גל חורי Date: 04.06.2006 Photo number: 5303 Views: 25k
Historical sites \ Jerusalem. Center City.
Pools of king Salomon.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 26.02.2006 Photo number: 4062 Views: 21k
Historical sites \ Summer, Historical sites
Photographer: © Николай Date: 16.08.2010 Photo number: 16342 Views: 23k
Historical sites \ Jerusalem Bastion
Photographer: © Carmel Garcia from Malta Date: 22.03.2011 Photo number: 17006 Views: 14k
Historical sites \ Jerusalem from the Mount of Olives
Photographer: © Carmel Garcia from Malta Date: 18.03.2011 Photo number: 16969 Views: 15k
Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1404 Views: 31k
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Historical sites \ Old City Walls and Gates
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.02.2005 Photo number: 821 Views: 31k
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Historical sites \ The Soviet Jewry House, History
Allenby St. Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 31.08.2009 Photo number: 11492 Views: 16k
Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1402 Views: 33k
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Historical sites \ Jerusalem. Old City.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 09.05.2006 Photo number: 5000 Views: 18k
Historical sites \ The Soviet Jewry House, History
Allenby St. Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 31.08.2009 Photo number: 11489 Views: 14k
Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Cripte
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1408 Views: 37k
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Historical sites \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1399 Views: 32k
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Historical sites \ Historical sites, Memorials, Monuments
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.02.2005 Photo number: 806 Views: 35k
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Historical sites \ Church of St. Mary Magdelene - Gethsamene
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.06.2005 Photo number: 1814 Views: 65k
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