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Photographer: © RomKri Date: 19.11.2005 Photo number: 2931 Views: 62k
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Chapel - Place where Christ said to Mary Magdalene "Touch me not" - Church of the Holy Sepulchre
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 20.05.2006 Photo number: 5157 Views: 40k
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Place to light candles - side of edicule - Holy Sepulchre
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 12.11.2005 Photo number: 2859 Views: 66k
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Palm trees on Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 08.10.2006 Photo number: 5988 Views: 29k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7207 Views: 49k
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Hagia Maria Sion Abbey (The place where Mary
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.09.2009 Photo number: 11802 Views: 39k
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Square in front of Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 10.11.2009 Photo number: 12478 Views: 25k
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Hagia Maria Sion Abbey (The place where Mary
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.09.2009 Photo number: 11803 Views: 39k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13496 Views: 57k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13497 Views: 60k
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Map of Old Jerusalem at Safra Square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.03.2011 Photo number: 16966 Views: 45k
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Har Hotsvim - Ramot Gimel Road
June 2005
A nice place!
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 17.07.2009 Photo number: 9942 Views: 15k
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13498 Views: 52k
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Jerusalem War Cemetery
04.08.2009
The Jerusalem War Cemetery, which is located on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem, is the final resting place of soldiers from Great Britain who fell in World War I.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 04.08.2009 Photo number: 10403 Views: 23k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13070 Views: 43k
Hagia Maria Sion Abbey (The place where Mary
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.09.2009 Photo number: 11800 Views: 21k
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The Wall of Gethsemane Garden
Gethsemane is a garden at the foot of the Mt. Olives in Jerusalem most famous as the place where Jesus and his disciples prayed the night before Jesus' crucifixion.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 30.12.2009 Photo number: 13343 Views: 17k
United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7214 Views: 24k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7213 Views: 22k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7181 Views: 22k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7210 Views: 21k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7193 Views: 19k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7185 Views: 20k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7211 Views: 22k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7212 Views: 22k
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United Buddy Bears in Safra square
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.08.2007 Photo number: 7194 Views: 19k
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Jerusalem War Cemetery
04.08.2009
The Jerusalem War Cemetery, which is located on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem, is the final resting place of soldiers from Great Britain who fell in World War I.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 04.08.2009 Photo number: 10405 Views: 15k
Mikes Place bar
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 21.11.2005 Photo number: 2949 Views: 10k
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The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13066 Views: 22k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13067 Views: 25k
Jerusalem War Cemetery
04.08.2009
The Jerusalem War Cemetery, which is located on Mount Scopus in Jerusalem, is the final resting place of soldiers from Great Britain who fell in World War I.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 04.08.2009 Photo number: 10404 Views: 13k
Place where stone sealed Christ´s tomb - Church of the Holy Sepulchure
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.02.2005 Photo number: 832 Views: 52k
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Jerusalem. Holy Cross.
On this place the tree of which have made a cross for Jesus Christ's crucifixion grew.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 14.08.2006 Photo number: 5776 Views: 15k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13065 Views: 23k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13064 Views: 19k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13068 Views: 21k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13063 Views: 22k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13060 Views: 21k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13061 Views: 19k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13062 Views: 20k