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City Center \ View on downtown from Jafa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 08.08.2009 Photo number: 10519 Views: 233k
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Damascus gate in time of light festival 2010
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.06.2010 Photo number: 16112 Views: 74k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 25.08.2009 Photo number: 11326 Views: 29k
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Lions’ Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 31.08.2010 Photo number: 16366 Views: 28k
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Tree behind Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.06.2013 Photo number: 19209 Views: 34k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 25.08.2009 Photo number: 11328 Views: 25k
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Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.10.2009 Photo number: 12225 Views: 22k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 01.09.2009 Photo number: 11555 Views: 46k
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Jaffa Gate after restoration
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.04.2010 Photo number: 15020 Views: 57k
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Jaffa gate at night
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 13.10.2009 Photo number: 12363 Views: 32k
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Jaffa gate at night
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 13.10.2009 Photo number: 12364 Views: 42k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © Gennadi Zimmerman Date: 23.06.2009 Photo number: 9493 Views: 40k
Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.10.2009 Photo number: 12224 Views: 26k
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Jaffa gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.06.2009 Photo number: 9437 Views: 22k
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Jaffa gate at night
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 13.10.2009 Photo number: 12362 Views: 20k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 20.09.2010 Photo number: 16414 Views: 32k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © Gennadi Zimmerman Date: 23.06.2009 Photo number: 9494 Views: 17k
Damascus Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 24.11.2009 Photo number: 12722 Views: 19k
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Jaffa gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.06.2009 Photo number: 9429 Views: 24k
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Square in front of Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 10.11.2009 Photo number: 12478 Views: 25k
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Jaffa gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.06.2009 Photo number: 9433 Views: 15k
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Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 08.08.2009 Photo number: 10648 Views: 18k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 25.08.2009 Photo number: 11327 Views: 15k
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Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13489 Views: 17k
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Jaffa Gate after restoration
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.04.2010 Photo number: 15015 Views: 26k
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Jaffa gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.01.2006 Photo number: 3602 Views: 34k
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Damascus Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 24.11.2009 Photo number: 12721 Views: 15k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13497 Views: 60k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13496 Views: 57k
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Jaffa Gate after restoration
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.04.2010 Photo number: 15016 Views: 27k
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Hanukkah Habad Sameach
Near Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 18.12.2009 Photo number: 12953 Views: 18k
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Lion's Gate of the Old City at night
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.04.2010 Photo number: 15272 Views: 20k
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Lions’ Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 31.08.2010 Photo number: 16364 Views: 17k
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Lion's Gate of the Old City at night
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.04.2010 Photo number: 15271 Views: 30k
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Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 08.08.2009 Photo number: 10649 Views: 12k
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Lions’ Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 31.08.2010 Photo number: 16365 Views: 17k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13498 Views: 52k
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Jaffa Gate, Saturday morning
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 08.08.2009 Photo number: 10647 Views: 14k
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Jaffa Gate
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.10.2009 Photo number: 12223 Views: 12k
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Jaffa Gate after restoration
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.04.2010 Photo number: 15019 Views: 21k
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