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Churches & Monasteries \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.05.2010 Photo number: 15821 Views: 58k
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Jerusalem Camel
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 01.05.2005 Photo number: 1376 Views: 50k
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David´s Tomb
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 03.05.2005 Photo number: 1389 Views: 49k
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Churches & Monasteries \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1396 Views: 26k
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Zion Sq.
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 05.06.2004 Photo number: 443 Views: 81k
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Churches & Monasteries \ Church of the Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 01.05.2005 Photo number: 1375 Views: 102k
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Mount Zion
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 02.05.2005 Photo number: 1377 Views: 67k
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Mount Zion
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.02.2010 Photo number: 13866 Views: 30k
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Photographer: © Moshe Porat M.D. Date: 07.11.2009 Photo number: 12437 Views: 29k
Mount Zion
Photographer: © Moshe Porat M.D. Date: 07.11.2009 Photo number: 12435 Views: 34k
Photographer: © Ron Peled Date: 14.02.2010 Photo number: 13941 Views: 29k
David playing the harp
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.05.2010 Photo number: 15635 Views: 32k
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Mount Zion
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.05.2010 Photo number: 15636 Views: 18k
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The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © Peter Rogov Date: 09.07.2009 Photo number: 9872 Views: 47k
David playing the harp
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.05.2010 Photo number: 15634 Views: 21k
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Destroying the old building on Kikar Zion
Photographer: © Gennadi Zimmerman Date: 27.06.2009 Photo number: 9672 Views: 27k
The Latin Cemetery on Mount Zion
Photographer: © Ron Peled Date: 14.02.2010 Photo number: 13925 Views: 23k
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13496 Views: 57k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13497 Views: 60k
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Landscape photos, Mount Zion
Photographer: © Moshe Porat M.D. Date: 09.11.2009 Photo number: 12473 Views: 20k
Destroying the old building on Kikar Zion
Photographer: © Gennadi Zimmerman Date: 27.06.2009 Photo number: 9674 Views: 22k
Destroying the old building on Kikar Zion
Photographer: © Gennadi Zimmerman Date: 27.06.2009 Photo number: 9671 Views: 20k
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13498 Views: 52k
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Churches & Monasteries \ Mary Magdalene, Entry to Russian Orthodox Church
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 02.12.2009 Photo number: 12754 Views: 22k
Churches & Monasteries \ Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 06.08.2011 Photo number: 17730 Views: 14k
Churches & Monasteries \ Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 06.08.2011 Photo number: 17741 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.09.2009 Photo number: 11879 Views: 22k
Churches & Monasteries \ Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in side
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.05.2010 Photo number: 15321 Views: 39k
Churches & Monasteries \ The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1395 Views: 51k
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Mount Zion
Photographer: © Марк Бокман Date: 14.03.2010 Photo number: 14267 Views: 18k
Churches & Monasteries \ St. Franciscus (wall in Mount Zion)
Photographer: © Александр Date: 15.02.2007 Photo number: 6622 Views: 13k
Churches & Monasteries \ Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.09.2009 Photo number: 11878 Views: 22k
View on the Juda Desert
Photographer: © Miriami Date: 31.07.2011 Photo number: 17696 Views: 48k
Churches & Monasteries \ Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 06.08.2011 Photo number: 17742 Views: 14k
Old City, Mount Zion
Photographer: © pmos_nmos Date: 27.10.2007 Photo number: 7578 Views: 37k
The Church of Dormition
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 04.05.2005 Photo number: 1401 Views: 48k
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Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 06.08.2011 Photo number: 17724 Views: 12k
Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 06.08.2011 Photo number: 17721 Views: 9k
Synagogue, Mevaseret Zion
20 July 2009
Mevaseret Zion is a suburb of Jerusalem. Today, Mevaseret Zion is composed of two distinct settlements—Maoz Zion and Mevaseret Yerushalayim—under the jurisdiction of one local council. The newer neighborhoods of Mevaseret Zion were not part of either settlement. Mevaseret Zion is located on a mountain ridge 750 meters above sea level, on the outskirts of Jerusalem.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 20.07.2009 Photo number: 10079 Views: 22k
Churches & Monasteries \ Church of Saint Peter in Gallicantu
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 06.08.2011 Photo number: 17745 Views: 9k