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Night photos \ Mount of Olives
BURIED IN MONT OLIVE CEMETERY IN AUGUST 1974
SERVED AS CHIEF RABBI OF EGYPT FROM 1960 IN THE TIME OF 1967 SIX DAYS WAR ,WHERE MOST OF THE COMMUNITY MEMBERS WERE TAKING TO PRISON
HE LEFT EGYPT IN MARCH 1972 AFTER EVERY PRISONER WAS RELEASED AND LEFT EGYPT WITH THEIR FAMILIES
LEAVING BEHIND A COMMUNITY OF ABOUT 300 PERSONS
ESTIMATE NUMBER FROM 1948 100,000.00
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 29.04.2005 Photo number: 1362 Views: 302k
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Damascus gate in time of light festival 2010
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.06.2010 Photo number: 16112 Views: 74k
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Jerusalem in the Time of the Second Temple
In the model of Jerusalem which recently moved from the Holyland Hotel to the Israel Museum.
Photographer: © Al Teich Date: 27.07.2006 Photo number: 5676 Views: 48k
Model of the Second Temple at the Israel Museum
This is in the model of Jerusalem at the time of the Second Temple. It was moved from the Holyland Hotel to the Israel Museum in late 2005.
Photographer: © Al Teich Date: 01.09.2007 Photo number: 7323 Views: 124k
The Dome of the Rock
Dominating the skyline of Jerusalem, a landmark without doubt, is the beautiful shrine of the Dome of the Rock. Built on a platform over the rock of Mt. Moriah 1,300 years ago by the Muslim Umayyad Caliph Abdul Malek Ibn Marwa. It was completed in 691 AD, 6 years after building commenced. The Dome of the Rock is a shrine in Al Aqsa Mosque commemorating the Prophet Muhammad´s miraculous journey to the Seven Heavens. Eight stairways with arcades lead to the raised platform of the Dome of the Rock. There is a sun dial atop the center top archway, accurate to within five minutes of the actual time.
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 08.03.2005 Photo number: 951 Views: 84k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13496 Views: 57k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13497 Views: 60k
Image licence
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13498 Views: 52k
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Great Synagogue
As early as 1923 the Chief Rabbis of Israel, Abraham Kook and Jacob Meir, mooted plans for a large central synagogue in Jerusalem. It was over 30 years later in 1958 when Heichal Shlomo, seat of the Israeli Rabbinate, was founded, that a small synagogue was established within the building. As time progressed and the need for more space grew, services were moved and held in the foyer of Heichal Shlomo. Soon afterwards, when the premises could not hold the number of worshippers attending, it was decided that a new, much larger synagogue be built.
Photographer: © pmos_nmos Date: 18.04.2009 Photo number: 8767 Views: 29k
Night photos \ Church in sunset
The gate to a cemetery at sunset time
Photographer: © Amiros Date: 27.11.2005 Photo number: 2978 Views: 15k
Night photos \ King David's Water Cistern
Jerusalem water cisten from the King David's time, placed in the backyard of St. Anna Church.
Photographer: © Tanya Date: 10.07.2005 Photo number: 2154 Views: 19k
Jerusalem.
Day time kind.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 14.09.2005 Photo number: 2440 Views: 12k
Here Jesus Falls the second time
Adoramus te, Christe, et benedicimus tibi. Quia per sanctam crucem tuam redemisti mundum

Yet he was pierced through for our faults, crushed for our sins. On him lies a punishment that brings un peace, and through his wounds we are healed. (Is. 53, 5)

It is not the healthy who need the doctor, but the sick...I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners. (Matthew 9, 12-13)
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.02.2005 Photo number: 839 Views: 50k
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Aaron Ovadia
A light unto the nations.
This was a photo taken a little before sunset - around the spring time.
Photographer: © Aaron Ovadia Date: 30.08.2006 Photo number: 5829 Views: 24k
Night photos \ Church in sunset
One of the churches in Jerusalem during sunset time
Photographer: © Amiros Date: 27.11.2005 Photo number: 2977 Views: 18k
The Dome of the Rock
Dominating the skyline of Jerusalem, a landmark without doubt, is the beautiful shrine of the Dome of the Rock. Built on a platform over the rock of Mt. Moriah 1,300 years ago by the Muslim Umayyad Caliph Abdul Malek Ibn Marwa. It was completed in 691 AD, 6 years after building commenced. The Dome of the Rock is a shrine in Al Aqsa Mosque commemorating the Prophet Muhammad's miraculous journey to the Seven Heavens. Eight stairways with arcades lead to the raised platform of the Dome of the Rock. There is a sun dial atop the center top archway, accurate to within five minutes of the actual time.
Photographer: © jshots Date: 21.02.2005 Photo number: 781 Views: 28k