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Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 12.06.2010 Photo number: 16032 Views: 17k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13070 Views: 43k
Great Synagogue
As early as 1923 the Chief Rabbis of Israel, Abraham Kook and Jacob Meir, mooted plans for a large central synagogue in Jerusalem. It was over 30 years later in 1958 when Heichal Shlomo, seat of the Israeli Rabbinate, was founded, that a small synagogue was established within the building. As time progressed and the need for more space grew, services were moved and held in the foyer of Heichal Shlomo. Soon afterwards, when the premises could not hold the number of worshippers attending, it was decided that a new, much larger synagogue be built.
Photographer: © pmos_nmos Date: 18.04.2009 Photo number: 8767 Views: 29k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13066 Views: 22k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13065 Views: 23k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13067 Views: 25k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13064 Views: 19k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13063 Views: 22k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13068 Views: 21k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13061 Views: 19k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13060 Views: 21k
The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13062 Views: 20k
Ramat-Shlomo
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 03.10.2007 Photo number: 7396 Views: 28k
Ramat-Shlomo
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 03.10.2007 Photo number: 7395 Views: 18k
Ramat-Shlomo
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 03.10.2007 Photo number: 7397 Views: 16k
Ramat-Shlomo
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 03.10.2007 Photo number: 7398 Views: 14k
ramat shlomo
Photographer: © Gidon Date: 12.03.2006 Photo number: 4167 Views: 12k