Search:
Churches & Monasteries \ Greek Orthodox bishop-Church of Holy Sepulcre
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 12.11.2005 Photo number: 2867 Views: 104k
Image licence
Churches & Monasteries \ Greek Orthodox hierarch-Church of the Holy Sepulcher
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.01.2006 Photo number: 3537 Views: 114k
Image licence
Churches & Monasteries \ Greek Orthodox bishop-Church of the Holy Sepulcher
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 14.01.2006 Photo number: 3536 Views: 83k
Image licence
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13496 Views: 57k
Image licence
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13497 Views: 60k
Image licence
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13498 Views: 52k
Image licence
Mar Elias Monastery, Jerusalem
13.08.2009
This Greek Orthodox Monastery stands like a fortress on a hill from which both Jerusalem and Bethlehem can be seen. Mar Elias Monastery is located 5 km to the north of Bethlehem on the way to Jerusalem, and was founded in the 6th century AD and rebuilt by the Emperor Manual Communes in 1160.
Legend has it that the building stands on the site where prophet Elijah (pbuh) rested on his flight from the Vengeance of Queen Jezebel, who was seeking vengeance after Elijah slaughtered the priests of Baal (1 Kings 19:15). Another tradition holds that Greek Bishop Elias of Bethlehem was buried here in 1345, and another holds that it places the sepulcher of St. Elias, an Egyptian monk who became Patriarch of Jerusalem in 494. Mar Elias is believed to answer the prayers of barren women and ailing children. From the monastery, Bethlehem can be seen to the south, Herodion to the southeast and sometimes the Dead Sea across the valley to the east.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 13.08.2009 Photo number: 10948 Views: 36k
Greek Orthodox Christian Church
19 July 2009
En Kerem, West Juresalem
Greek Orthodox Christian Church belonging to
Greek Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 19.07.2009 Photo number: 10057 Views: 12k
Mar Elias Monastery, Jerusalem
13.08.2009
This Greek Orthodox Monastery stands like a fortress on a hill from which both Jerusalem and Bethlehem can be seen. Mar Elias Monastery is located 5 km to the north of Bethlehem on the way to Jerusalem, and was founded in the 6th century AD and rebuilt by the Emperor Manual Communes in 1160.
Legend has it that the building stands on the site where prophet Elijah (pbuh) rested on his flight from the Vengeance of Queen Jezebel, who was seeking vengeance after Elijah slaughtered the priests of Baal (1 Kings 19:15). Another tradition holds that Greek Bishop Elias of Bethlehem was buried here in 1345, and another holds that it places the sepulcher of St. Elias, an Egyptian monk who became Patriarch of Jerusalem in 494. Mar Elias is believed to answer the prayers of barren women and ailing children. From the monastery, Bethlehem can be seen to the south, Herodion to the southeast and sometimes the Dead Sea across the valley to the east.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 13.08.2009 Photo number: 10941 Views: 29k
Mar Elias Monastery, Jerusalem
13.08.2009
This Greek Orthodox Monastery stands like a fortress on a hill from which both Jerusalem and Bethlehem can be seen. Mar Elias Monastery is located 5 km to the north of Bethlehem on the way to Jerusalem, and was founded in the 6th century AD and rebuilt by the Emperor Manual Communes in 1160.
Legend has it that the building stands on the site where prophet Elijah (pbuh) rested on his flight from the Vengeance of Queen Jezebel, who was seeking vengeance after Elijah slaughtered the priests of Baal (1 Kings 19:15). Another tradition holds that Greek Bishop Elias of Bethlehem was buried here in 1345, and another holds that it places the sepulcher of St. Elias, an Egyptian monk who became Patriarch of Jerusalem in 494. Mar Elias is believed to answer the prayers of barren women and ailing children. From the monastery, Bethlehem can be seen to the south, Herodion to the southeast and sometimes the Dead Sea across the valley to the east.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 13.08.2009 Photo number: 10942 Views: 28k
The Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, Old City
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.03.2010 Photo number: 14162 Views: 10k
Churches & Monasteries \ Greek Orthodox Christian Church
19 July 2009
En Kerem, West Juresalem
Greek Orthodox Christian Church belonging to
Greek Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 19.07.2009 Photo number: 10058 Views: 14k
Mar Elias Monastery, Jerusalem
13.08.2009
This Greek Orthodox Monastery stands like a fortress on a hill from which both Jerusalem and Bethlehem can be seen. Mar Elias Monastery is located 5 km to the north of Bethlehem on the way to Jerusalem, and was founded in the 6th century AD and rebuilt by the Emperor Manual Communes in 1160.
Legend has it that the building stands on the site where prophet Elijah (pbuh) rested on his flight from the Vengeance of Queen Jezebel, who was seeking vengeance after Elijah slaughtered the priests of Baal (1 Kings 19:15). Another tradition holds that Greek Bishop Elias of Bethlehem was buried here in 1345, and another holds that it places the sepulcher of St. Elias, an Egyptian monk who became Patriarch of Jerusalem in 494. Mar Elias is believed to answer the prayers of barren women and ailing children. From the monastery, Bethlehem can be seen to the south, Herodion to the southeast and sometimes the Dead Sea across the valley to the east.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 13.08.2009 Photo number: 10945 Views: 41k
Churches & Monasteries \ Greek Orthodox Christian Church
19 July 2009
En Kerem, West Juresalem
Greek Orthodox Christian Church belonging to
Greek Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 19.07.2009 Photo number: 10056 Views: 14k
Mar Elias Monastery, Jerusalem
13.08.2009
This Greek Orthodox Monastery stands like a fortress on a hill from which both Jerusalem and Bethlehem can be seen. Mar Elias Monastery is located 5 km to the north of Bethlehem on the way to Jerusalem, and was founded in the 6th century AD and rebuilt by the Emperor Manual Communes in 1160.
Legend has it that the building stands on the site where prophet Elijah (pbuh) rested on his flight from the Vengeance of Queen Jezebel, who was seeking vengeance after Elijah slaughtered the priests of Baal (1 Kings 19:15). Another tradition holds that Greek Bishop Elias of Bethlehem was buried here in 1345, and another holds that it places the sepulcher of St. Elias, an Egyptian monk who became Patriarch of Jerusalem in 494. Mar Elias is believed to answer the prayers of barren women and ailing children. From the monastery, Bethlehem can be seen to the south, Herodion to the southeast and sometimes the Dead Sea across the valley to the east.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 13.08.2009 Photo number: 10947 Views: 22k
Mar Elias Monastery, Jerusalem
13.08.2009
This Greek Orthodox Monastery stands like a fortress on a hill from which both Jerusalem and Bethlehem can be seen. Mar Elias Monastery is located 5 km to the north of Bethlehem on the way to Jerusalem, and was founded in the 6th century AD and rebuilt by the Emperor Manual Communes in 1160.
Legend has it that the building stands on the site where prophet Elijah (pbuh) rested on his flight from the Vengeance of Queen Jezebel, who was seeking vengeance after Elijah slaughtered the priests of Baal (1 Kings 19:15). Another tradition holds that Greek Bishop Elias of Bethlehem was buried here in 1345, and another holds that it places the sepulcher of St. Elias, an Egyptian monk who became Patriarch of Jerusalem in 494. Mar Elias is believed to answer the prayers of barren women and ailing children. From the monastery, Bethlehem can be seen to the south, Herodion to the southeast and sometimes the Dead Sea across the valley to the east.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 13.08.2009 Photo number: 10943 Views: 21k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15389 Views: 17k
METOXION
The Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, Old City
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.03.2010 Photo number: 14163 Views: 9k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15388 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15386 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15385 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15387 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15383 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15382 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15384 Views: 16k
Churches & Monasteries \ Patriarch of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 09.05.2010 Photo number: 15381 Views: 14k