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Night photos \ Entrance into Western Wall
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 07.05.2010 Photo number: 15344 Views: 52k
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Jerusalem in snow
The entrance of Jerusalem last winter...
Photographer: © יובל אדלר Date: 17.03.2007 Photo number: 6681 Views: 42k
Entrance to the city from the Dead Sea
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.06.2013 Photo number: 19160 Views: 24k
The central entrance to city.
"Welcome" and "Happy journey".
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 23.01.2006 Photo number: 3717 Views: 25k
Entrance to the city from the Dead Sea
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.06.2013 Photo number: 19155 Views: 10k
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13496 Views: 57k
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Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13497 Views: 60k
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Entrance to the city from the Dead Sea
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.06.2013 Photo number: 19154 Views: 9k
Entrance to the city from the Dead Sea
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.06.2013 Photo number: 19159 Views: 9k
Entrance of the city.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 12.06.2010 Photo number: 16031 Views: 14k
Gehenna
Gehenna, gehinnam, or gehinnom (Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם, Greek γεεννα) are words used in Jewish and Christian writings for the place where evil people go in the afterlife (see Hell). The name is derived from a geographical site in Jerusalem known as the Valley of Hinnom, one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City. Initially the site where idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to the god Molech (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6), the valley later became the common wasteyard for all the refuse of Jerusalem. Here the dead bodies of animals and of criminals, and rubbish, were cast and, according to legend, consumed by a constant fire. In time it became the image of the place of everlasting destruction in Jewish tradition[1]. However, Jewish tradition suggests the valley had a 'gate' which led down to a molten lake of fire. (Possibly 'The furnace of Yahweh' in Zion to which Isaiah refers 31:9, 30:33). It is unknown whether this 'gate' was an actual geophysical feature within the valley that provided the focus for cultic activity (2 Kings 23:10) or simply a metaphorical identification with the entrance to the underworld that had come to be associated with the valley.

Gehenna is cited in the New Testament and in early Christian writing to represent the final place where the wicked will be punished or destroyed after resurrection. In both Rabbinical Jewish and Christian writing, Gehenna as a destination of the wicked is different from Sheol or Hades, the abode of the dead.

Taken from wikipedia.org
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 17.01.2010 Photo number: 13498 Views: 52k
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Post Office building at the entrance to the city
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 01.09.2009 Photo number: 11520 Views: 16k
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Entrance to the city from the Dead Sea
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.06.2013 Photo number: 19158 Views: 6k
Entrance to the city from the Dead Sea
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.06.2013 Photo number: 19156 Views: 6k
Entrance to the city from the Dead Sea
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 05.06.2013 Photo number: 19157 Views: 6k
Night photos \ Post Office building at the entrance to the City
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 01.09.2009 Photo number: 11527 Views: 14k
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Entrance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 23.02.2005 Photo number: 802 Views: 33k
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Post Office building at the entrance to the City
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 01.09.2009 Photo number: 11526 Views: 13k
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Night photos \ Clock in the City Entrance
Photographer: © Jshots Date: 11.08.2005 Photo number: 2306 Views: 22k
Night photos \ Jerusalem.
Entrance to city.
Photographer: © Pes & Lev Date: 27.06.2006 Photo number: 5438 Views: 16k
Robinson's Arch
The arch is thought to have been an entrance to the Temple Mount from the street below.
Photographer: © Al Teich Date: 21.01.2006 Photo number: 3710 Views: 27k
The central entrance to Jerusalem.
Sakharov Gardens.
Photographer: © Pes & lev Date: 17.02.2006 Photo number: 3977 Views: 11k
Commercial advertisement on one of the Jerusalem Hotels - Entrance to Jerusalem
The advertisement presents a new method for hair removal. One could wonder if the experimental technique was first applied on that tree that grows sideways?
Photographer: © Barak Sekeles Date: 18.02.2006 Photo number: 3987 Views: 14k
Icons of the 12 apostles over the entrance to the edicule - Holy Sepulcher
Photographer: © Леонид Date: 06.01.2007 Photo number: 6489 Views: 13k
St. Anna yard
The entrance to St. Anna Church
Photographer: © Tanya Date: 10.07.2005 Photo number: 2156 Views: 20k