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Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13056 Views: 35k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13088 Views: 117k
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13101 Views: 33k
Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13057 Views: 14k
© RomKri \ Brichat Sultan
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13052 Views: 19k
Image licence
Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13053 Views: 13k
Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13058 Views: 13k
© Valery Dembitsky \ East Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13102 Views: 29k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13080 Views: 111k
Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13074 Views: 12k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13070 Views: 87k
Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13054 Views: 12k
© Mikhail Levit \ Temple Mount
Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13059 Views: 14k
© Valery Dembitsky \ East Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13103 Views: 14k
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13100 Views: 20k
Photographer: © Mikhail Levit Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13055 Views: 12k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13097 Views: 40k
© Valery Dembitsky \ East Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13105 Views: 13k
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13099 Views: 21k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13087 Views: 38k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13096 Views: 37k
© Valery Dembitsky \ East Jerusalem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13104 Views: 13k
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13098 Views: 21k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13078 Views: 79k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13091 Views: 26k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13092 Views: 39k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13095 Views: 26k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13065 Views: 48k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13066 Views: 46k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13067 Views: 47k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13075 Views: 54k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13076 Views: 58k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13077 Views: 57k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13081 Views: 53k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13082 Views: 54k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13084 Views: 57k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13086 Views: 23k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13094 Views: 23k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13063 Views: 44k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13064 Views: 40k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13068 Views: 41k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13083 Views: 50k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13089 Views: 23k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13093 Views: 23k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13060 Views: 40k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13061 Views: 40k
© Valery Dembitsky \ The Ancient Synagogue
Motza is first mentioned in the Talmud (Tractate Succah) as the place where residents of Jerusalem used to cut their willow branches as one of the four species of fruits and plants required for the Festival of Sukkot.

Motza was rediscovered in 1860, when Shlomo Yecheskel and Yehoshua Yellin, residents of the Old City of Jerusalem, jointly acquired a plot of land in order to initiate and develop agriculture outside the walls of the Old City. Vineyards and trees were planted while using the local spring and well.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13062 Views: 40k
© Valery Dembitsky \ Nebi Samwil (The Prophet Samuel)
The Tomb of Samuel, (Arabic: نبي صموئيل‎, translit. Nebi Samwil Hebrew: קבר שמואל‎, translit. Kever Shmuel;), is the traditional burial site of the biblical Hebrew prophet Samuel, atop a steep hill at an elevation of 908 meters above sea level. It is situated to the north of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Ramot. On the site is a building containing a mosque built in the 18th century that was formerly a church. The tomb itself is located in an underground chamber where a small synagogue is located.
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13085 Views: 50k
© Valery Dembitsky \ New Monument, Hadassah Ein Kerem
Photographer: © Valery Dembitsky Date: 21.12.2009 Photo number: 13071 Views: 24k