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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2669 Views: 80k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2671 Views: 62k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2675 Views: 43k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2676 Views: 45k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2674 Views: 28k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2663 Views: 22k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2670 Views: 27k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2667 Views: 23k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2673 Views: 22k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2679 Views: 24k
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© RomKri \ The Flamingo Pond
The David Lauffer Flamingo Pond is home to three flocks of flamingoes. The Caribbean flamingoes from Cuba are the most brightly coloured of the three. They are very close relatives of the Greater flamingoes, and are generally regarded as a race of the same species. Greater flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) can be found in the Middle East, and occasionally appear in Israel's few remaining wetlands in winter. They have a much broader geographical range than the physically smaller Lesser flamingoes (Phoeniconaias minor), but both species reside in Africa and parts of Asia.

The striking coloration of these birds is the product of a diet rich in red pigments. In the wild, flamingoes eat large amounts of very small crustaceans to give them their rich colour. In captivity, the pink color is often enhanced by the addition of red-pigmented ingredients such as beets and carrots, as well as sweet paprika and other natural items, to give a bold and beautiful plumage.

http://www.jerusalemzoo.org.il/english/upload/tour/flamingo.html
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2672 Views: 40k
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© RomKri \ Flamingo
The David Lauffer Flamingo Pond is home to three flocks of flamingoes. The Caribbean flamingoes from Cuba are the most brightly coloured of the three. They are very close relatives of the Greater flamingoes, and are generally regarded as a race of the same species. Greater flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) can be found in the Middle East, and occasionally appear in Israel's few remaining wetlands in winter. They have a much broader geographical range than the physically smaller Lesser flamingoes (Phoeniconaias minor), but both species reside in Africa and parts of Asia.

The striking coloration of these birds is the product of a diet rich in red pigments. In the wild, flamingoes eat large amounts of very small crustaceans to give them their rich colour. In captivity, the pink color is often enhanced by the addition of red-pigmented ingredients such as beets and carrots, as well as sweet paprika and other natural items, to give a bold and beautiful plumage.


http://www.jerusalemzoo.org.il/english/upload/tour/flamingo.html
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2678 Views: 42k
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© RomKri \ The Asian Elephants
The Jerusalem Biblical Zoo is especially proud of its elephant exhibit. The Sarah Haefner Elephant House and Enclosure is home to a herd of four elephant cows brought here from Thailand. Our females are now once again enjoying the company of a young Israeli-born male named Teddy, who joined them in September 2001. The elephants all belong to the Asiatic species Elephas maximus.

Our elephant keepers work with the animals using methods similar to those employed in Thailand. These methods involve having the keeper accompany the elephant at all times throughout most of the day. In Thailand, a keeper is involved in more than simple, basic animal care such as cleaning, feeding, and caring for the animal's surroundings and living arrangements; rather, he also functions as a trainer, developing the elephant's skills in performing tasks such as the pushing and hauling of heavy tree trunks. By making use of this system in our zoo, we can afford to enrich the elephant's experience with stimulating activities, for instance walks outside the compound and throughout the zoo. Apart from enhancing the elephant's health and welfare, such walks are also a source of entertainment for our visitors, who are thrilled at the sight of a row of elephants marching in single file, with each trunk grasping the tail in front of it. In addition, such intimate handling of the elephant herd allows us to simplify medical treatment, and easily perform basic procedures such as injections and blood tests. Under different circumstances, when elephants are not appropriately trained, such procedures can be quite complex, and anesthesia is required.

We are happy to illustrate the special skills that our elephants have acquired by conducting elephant demonstrations in the exhibit on a regular basis. These demonstrations take place during holidays, as well as throughout the summer break.



http://www.jerusalemzoo.org.il/english/upload/tour/elephants.html
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2662 Views: 82k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2665 Views: 24k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2664 Views: 19k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2666 Views: 17k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2668 Views: 21k
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© RomKri \ Jerusalem Zoo
Photographer: © RomKri Date: 28.10.2005 Photo number: 2677 Views: 19k
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